COMP 310/ECSE 427- Operating Systems

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Welcome to the COMP310/ECSE 427course web site.
This web site is designed to works in tandem with WEB CT.

Computers are machines that do not operate on their own.  Actually they are not that intelligent at all.  They are an assembly of complex components that individually have some impressive built-in features but, in the end, require help to coordinate themselves and to communicate with humans.  This is where operating systems come in.  This is an introductory course in computer operating systems.  In this course we will study the theoretical and practical concepts behind modern operating systems.  In Particular, we will study the basic structure of an operating system, its components, design strategies, algorithms and schemes used to design and implement different components of an operating system.  Major components to be studied include: processes, inter-process communication, scheduling, memory management, virtual memory, storage management, network management, and security.

Primary learning outcome: To get a clear understanding of the major principles & algorithms that underlie an operating system and how they interplay with it and the hardware.

Secondary learning outcomes:  After taking this course, you should be able to: (1) identify the core functions of operating systems and how they are architected to support these functions, (2) explain the algorithms and principles on which the core functions are built on, (3) explain the major performance issues with regard to each core function, and (4) discuss the operating system features required for a particular target application.

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Prof. Joseph Vybihal | Web CT | SOCS | Email Prof. | ©2007 Computer Aided Technology