McGill University
Computer Science Dept.

Computer Science 767B

Advanced Topics in Graphics:
Non-Photorealistic Rendering

Allison Klein

Winter 2005


Projects:

Students in the seminar will form groups of one, two, or three people. Each group will do one big project that spans the semester. The scale of the project should be roughly the scale of picking out a SIGGRAPH paper and implementing what it describes. The goal of the project is to give you practice at doing research and development in the topic of the course, non-photorealistic rendering. The project can be roughly broken down into the following steps: 

  1. Decide on a project and turn in a one- to two-page, single-spaced written proposal (due January 27) outlining:
  2. Do a literature search on previous, related work
  3. Implement and test your algorithm/application 
  4. Give a presentation of your results in class (either Thursday April 7 or Tuesday April 12)
  5. Write up a description of your work, 8-12 pages in length, and create a web page that summarizes your approach and showcases your results.  The paper should in the form of a conference paper, like the ones we have covered in class.  Be sure to compare your results to previous work and include references to at least three related papers. 

The final project grade will be based both on the quality and robustness of your results and the quality of your write-up and presentation. Part of the research process is being able to communicate your results through writing. Therefore, projects with poor write-ups will suffer at grading time. 

Below is a list of suggested projects. The more students on a team, the more ambitious a project should be. Students are also encouraged to propose other projects, however these must be discussed with the professor before the official proposal deadline (Thursday, January 27). For those projects requiring digital images, the professor has a (crappy) digital camera that can be borrowed. For projects requiring digital video, if you don't have access to a digital video camera, check with the professor. It is perfectly acceptable (and even encouraged) for teams to collaborate on getting source video materials.

Project Reports #1 and #2:

Each team will be responsible for two progress reports during the semester (February 15 and March 17 respectively). The progress report will consist of two parts:

The 8-minute in-class presentation: In order to keep things moving, each team will do their presentations from a web page, and only one member per team will present. I will bring my laptop (plus a network cable) to class, and then each student will simply type in their project web page URL and use that as the basis for their presentation. Your presentation should include:

  1. A brief outline of what your project is
  2. Your specific project goals (i.e. what you actually intend to implement over the course of the entire project)
  3. What you intended to have implemented by now (according to the project proposal you already handed in)
  4. What your team has actually done so far (and who has done what)
  5. Any other interesting items to note. For example "Based on the paper, we thought doing item X would be really easy, but it turns out to be quite hard because the authors didn't say anything about floating point error issues." Or "When I read the paper, I found section Y to be really confusing, but now that I have implemented it, it is actually quite straight-forward."

As always, pictures are always much appreciated. Certainly a picture representing your goal and a picture representing what you have now seem like a good start. You can also include more images or videos if appropriate. Don't go over 8 minutes. For your second presentation, items 1 and 2 can be covered more quickly since students will have seen them before.

Final Presentation and Paper

A reminder: the final project grade will be based both on the quality and robustness of your results and the quality of your write-up and presentation. Part of the research process is being able to communicate your results through writing. Therefore, projects with poor write-ups or final presentations will suffer at grading time.

The Presentation:

The final presentation will be an in-class presentation. Plan on speaking for 12 minutes and allowing 3 or so minutes for questions. Just as with our progress reports,  teams will do their presentations from a web page, and only one member per team will present. I will bring my laptop (plus a network cable) to class, and then each student will simply type in their project web page URL and use that as the basis for their presentation. Just as with your progress reports, your presentation should include:

  1. A brief outline of what your project is
  2. What you intended to have implemented by now (according to the project proposal you handed in)
  3. What your team actually accomplished (and who has done what)
  4. Any other interesting items to note. For example "Based on the paper, we thought doing item X would be really easy, but it turns out to be quite hard because the authors didn't say anything about floating point error issues." Or "When I read the paper, I found section Y to be really confusing, but now that I have implemented it, it is actually quite straight-forward."

As always, pictures are always much appreciated. Certainly a picture representing your goal and a picture representing what you have now seem like a good start. You can also include more images or videos if appropriate. If you have any large files, please ask me to download them to my laptop before class .

Some important details:

The Paper:

The final paper is due Wednesday, April 13th at 5pm. No extensions under any circumstances will be granted. Papers should be 8-12 pages in length in the general form of a conference paper, like the ones we have covered in class.  Be sure to compare your results to previous work and include references to at least three related papers. Important details:

List of Project Web Pages

Final Presentation Schedule

Thursday, April 7

  1. Eric Blais
  2. Bill Cheung
  3. Michael Imbrogno and Derek Rivait
  4. Dmytro Prykhodko and Leonid Gaiazov
  5. Denis Dubé

Tuesday, April 12

  1. Denis Lebel and Felix Martineau
  2. Aditya Bhatia, Ran Chen, Qinghu Liao
  3. Pawel Kowalczyk
  4. Melanie Coggan
  5. Michael Batchelder and Kacper Wysocki