Ultrasound image analysis for applications in speech science

Cathy Laporte

Jan. 31, 2014, 2 p.m. - None

MC 103


Ultrasound (US) imaging is an effective and non invasive way of observing the tongue motions involved in normal and pathological speech, and the results of US studies are of interest to the study of the mechanisms underlying speech as well as the development of new strategies in speech therapy. (Semi-)automatically segmenting the tongue contour as it evolves in ultrasound video sequences is an image analysis task of particular interest since it allows the systematic study of tongue shape and motion. Challenges include maintaining high quality tongue tracking over time, as well as monitoring segmentation quality and developing meaningful ways to characterize tongue shape and motion. Our preliminary results touch upon each of these challenges and show how new adaptations of techniques previously rooted in the computer vision literature can be combined to provide useful tools to the speech scientist.

Catherine Laporte obtained her Ph.D. from McGill University in 2010 and is now a professor at the department of electrical engineering at École de technologie supérieure (ÉTS). She teaches courses in medical imaging, biomedical instrumentation and algorithms. Her research group focuses on the development of new methods for the analysis of ultrasound images to address problems such as 3-D reconstruction, motion and deformation tracking, segmentation and registration, with applications in orthopaedics and speech science.